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Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework
Culture Northwest   1 March 2007

Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework
March 2007

Foreword

Merseyside is an area of dynamic change and opportunity. International companies such as Jaguar, Coutts, Unilever, Alliance & Leicester, US Airways, Bosch, IBM, The Bank of New York and O2 have chosen to locate here because Merseyside presents an environment in which they can thrive and grow.
That environment is substantially shaped by the rich heritage of the area. Indeed, for many people, Merseyside is defined by that heritage. The architecture, the history, the cultural richness and creativity of Merseyside have helped to make it a special place with a fierce pride and commitment which helps to give investors the confidence that they will be able to attract and retain a high quality workforce to develop their business. So the protection, restoration and revitalisation of heritage assets is of great importance to the environment, quality of life and competitiveness of Merseyside.
There are many agencies engaged in this process, each with differing responsibilities and priorities but all striving to preserve and enhance the richness distinctiveness of Merseyside. For the first time, the preparation of this framework brought together some of these agencies to determine how they can co-ordinate their investment to achieve the most effective outcomes. The partners will retain their own distinctive purposes but here we demonstrate how a pattern of combined and separate investments will best serve the future of Merseyside.
The research behind this report has shown that the demand for investment in heritage projects hugely exceeds the supply of funds to support such projects. The framework for investment that this report proposes will enable applicants and funding bodies to make wise and timely judgements about priorities.
This framework provides an opportunity to ensure that there is strategic investment in heritage in the period up to 2008 and beyond. The impact of this investment on the image and quality of life of the sub region will directly and indirectly contribute to its continuing economic success.
.
This Framework has been developed from original work by Jura Consultants by a steering group representing:
• Culture Northwest
• English Heritage
• Heritage Lottery Fund
• Liverpool City Council
• The Mersey Partnership
• Museums Libraries and Archives Northwest
• National Museums Liverpool
• The National Trust
• Northwest Regional Development Agency
© Culture Northwest 2007. All Rights Reserved 2

CONTENTS PAGE
Introduction to Heritage Investment Strategies and Frameworks 4
Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework 8
Criteria 10
Ranking Projects – Stage 1 10
Ranking Projects – Stage 2 12
Summary of Possible Funding Agencies’ Priorities 17
Conclusion 18
Appendix 1: National Heritage Funders, 19
Policy Makers and Key Agencies
Appendix 2: Quick Self Assessment Tool 25

Introduction to Heritage Investment Strategies and Frameworks
What is Heritage?
Heritage refers to the buildings, objects and the environment, whether natural, or affected by human activities, which are important to the character and identity of the United Kingdom.
It includes:
  • • Art
  • • Artefacts
  • • Conservation areas
  • • Historic buildings and sites
  • • Intangible heritage (oral history)
  • • Landscapes
  • • Museums, libraries and archives
  • • Sculpture and monuments

It provides the context for our every day lives, has shaped and influenced our regional, local and cultural identities and ultimately contributes to our quality of life.

Why invest in heritage?
Heritage is central to the image of the North West – it enhances our national and international profile and provides the backdrop for people’s experience of the area. Our heritage remains an asset with the ability to enrich our experience of our environment, even when vacant or in poor condition. The challenge is to see beyond any immediate constraints and make heritage work for owners, occupiers, community and environment.

Heritage works for the economy:

Heritage investment can play a key part in regeneration, sustainability, and tourism.
Regeneration:

The NWDA identifies the region’s varied heritage assets as “under-exploited economic resources” 1
Heritage creates jobs. 9629 jobs in the North West are directly related to heritage, and the members of the Historic Houses Association alone contribute some £23.3m to the NW economy.2

  • 1 NWDA Regional Economic Strategy
  • 2 Unless listed separately, all figures are from Heritage Counts
The regeneration of buildings can reinforce a sense of community, make a major contribution to the local economy and act as a catalyst for improvements across the wider area.

Commercial schemes which reuse historic buildings can have an economic value equal to or even higher than new build developments. The creative reuse of historic buildings can bring a return on investment as good as any type of building and is certainly the best form of ‘green development’.3 Although more difficult to quantify, there is also evidence that neighbouring property and land values increase as a result of areas becoming more desirable places to live and work.

Sustainability
Re-use lessens the amount of energy expended on re-development. Half of Britain’s CO2 emissions come from the creation and transport of building materials.
Re-use reduces waste. 24% of all waste is generated by demolition and construction – it is more environmentally sustainable to reuse and recycle old buildings.4 Therefore regeneration of historic buildings can provide savings over redevelopment.

Economy
Spend on heritage boosts local economies. For example, a recent survey on historic farm buildings in the Lake District showed that for every £1 of public money invested, £2.49 was generated in the local economy. Furthermore a review of the ‘heritage dividend’ of ‘Conservation Area Partnership Schemes (CAPS) and Heritage Economic Regeneration Schemes (HERS) in 2002 found that every £10,000 of heritage investment levered in £46,000 match funding from private sector and public sources. 5
Tourism and the Visitor Economy

The 79 Historic Houses Association (HHA) members of the North West employ 536 people (full, part time and seasonal staff), and in 2005-6 had more than 1,265,574 visitors. Meanwhile, the National Trust had 779,000 visitors to its paid for properties in the region in 2005-6. This data illustrates part of the contribution of heritage tourism to the wider visitor economy.

Over 60% of visitors to the Lake District rate the sense of history and tradition as extremely or very important to their visit. Once they have been attracted to visit the high profile, easy to access heritage sites, many will then go on to explore the smaller sites.
6
The following table shows the 10 most popular visitor attractions in Merseyside for 2005.
Merseyside’s Top Attractions 2005

Albert Dock
5,942,485
􀀹
2
Mersey Ferries
685,255
􀀹
3
Tate Liverpool
616,570
􀀹
4
Knowsley Safari Park
505,237
5
Croxteth Hall and Country Park
423,268
􀀹
6
Empire Theatre Liverpool
400,000*
7
Liverpool Cathedral (C of E)
386,863
􀀹
8
Merseyside Maritime Museum
355,343
􀀹
9
Wirral Country Park
315,000

Source: The Mersey Partnership *2003 figures

Six of these top attractions can be considered as ‘heritage’ attractions which demonstrate its intrinsic link to Merseyside’s tourism industry. It is important to note that whilst the Empire Theatre is Grade II listed we believe that visitors use the attraction for entertainment purposes rather than its heritage merit.
Cultural tourists not only account for 40% of international trips to the UK but they also spend more than leisure tourists – between 9% and 40% per trip. Therefore investing in heritage can have a higher benefit than other leisure investments.

Heritage works for people:

People gravitate to areas with historic buildings because they provide
  • • A variety of spaces, building types, sizes and uses
  • • Interesting architecture and local character
  • • Human scale buildings and streetscapes
  • • Social interaction, a sense of place and quality of life.
These factors contribute to attribute higher financial, social and economic values for such areas.
People like visiting heritage attractions. Six of the most visited 10 attractions in our region have a heritage aspect. The latest DCMS ‘Taking Part’ survey showed that 66.7% of people in the North West paid at least one visit to a historic site from September 2005 to July 2006. 37% visited at least 3 or 4 times a year, and 19% visiting at least once a month. 43% visited a museum or gallery, 6% visited an archive.

Heritage contributes to the quality of life, and a sense of place, and so fosters civic pride. This is one of the factors that make places distinctive – and this in turn makes them places people will want to visit. In addition, heritage sites provide a learning resource and volunteering opportunities. These social benefits of the historic environment are rather difficult to measure but such intangible factors ought to be included in considering the benefits of heritage investment.

What is a heritage investment strategy?
The demand for investment in heritage projects hugely exceeds the supply of funds to support such projects. A heritage investment strategy is the long term plan, in this case, for funders to work together to optimise the results of their funding. A heritage investment framework gives the tools to assess projects in terms of common priorities for an area. A framework does not replace existing priorities of funders, but guides both funders and applicants on what should be most beneficial to the area from a wider perspective.

7 Taking Part: The National Survey of Culture, Leisure & Sport. Provisional results from the first nine months of the 2005/2006 survey

Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework
Summary

Heritage is vital to the economy of Merseyside – in tourism, learning and skills, image, regeneration, and non-economic benefits, reinforced by its World Heritage Site status. At the same time, it is impossible to fund all heritage projects and the end use and its associated outputs must be carefully considered and maximised.

The principle behind the Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework is that:

“All heritage investment should achieve improvements in the surroundings that we inhabit and contribute to the daily lives of citizens irrespective of whether they are directly connected with heritage. “
All projects over £500,000 should be assessed in the light of this vision, given that there are far more heritage projects than money to achieve them.

The Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework
  • • Is for project proposers and funders of heritage based projects costed at over £500,000.
  • • Should aid the preparation of bids, by asking questions which will make bids more focused and with a stronger chance of success in funding and outputs/outcomes
  • • Should assist projects with decisions about which funders to approach
  • • Is designed to maximise the investment in heritage across Merseyside by promoting the heritage and economic benefits from such investment opportunities
  • • Will promote a shared approach to assessing the impact of proposed projects to ascertain the potential heritage and economic impact. This will enable funding partnerships to be identified at an early stage
  • • Will ensure that all projects consider and identify their support for the regional strategies of NWDA, HLF, EH, MLA, Local Authorities, and other regional and sub-regional partnerships
The Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework Steering Group has prepared this summary of the assessment criteria for projects, in order to explain investment decisions by the major organisations which fund heritage and regeneration projects with a value over £500,000. Below this level, projects should only be ranked if they have a regional impact. The framework should assist those organisations which are preparing heritage and regeneration projects to understand the basis upon which applications for funding will be assessed. Working through an application and assessing it against the criteria given here will help projects identify where they need to improve in order to achieve greater likelihood of funding, and assist them in defining the most appropriate sources of support.

Criteria
To assist projects become more focused, generate more benefit to Merseyside, and be able to raise funds from the appropriate source, it is necessary to find a way to assess and therefore compare projects. Jura Consultants devised a two stage assessment process which has been refined to make it more consistent. This is based on giving an initial ranking from a quick assessment of each project’s potential heritage merit/benefit and economic impact, followed by a more detailed assessment of each project’s potential impacts. It does not replace a funder’s own application process. See Appendix 2 for a ready to use version.

Ranking Projects - Stage 1
The first stage of the ranking process is to make an assessment of the potential heritage merit/benefit and economic impact based on the available project description. Projects should be allocated to the appropriate one of the following quadrants:

Quadrant 1: High Heritage Benefit/Merit and High Economic Impact
Quadrant 2: Low Heritage Benefit/Merit and High Economic Impact
Quadrant 3: High Heritage Benefit/Merit and Low Economic Impact
Quadrant 4: Low Heritage Benefit/Merit and Low Economic Impact
Local significance only

“High heritage benefit” includes activity involving the following assets:
• Grade I and II* Buildings/Sites
• Large groups of Grade II Buildings
• Grade II Buildings with high heritage contents, i.e. collections
• National Register of Historic Vessels – Core Collection and Designated Vessels
• Special Area of Conservation, including World Heritage Site
• Conservation Areas which contain a high proportion of Listed Buildings
• Special Protection Areas
• Internationally designated nature conservation sites (i.e Ramsar)
• Site of Special Scientific Interest
• Internationally and nationally important museums/libraries/archives/items
• Grade I and II* Parks and Gardens (on English Heritage’s Register)
“Low heritage benefit” includes activity involving the following assets::
• Individual Grade II Buildings/Sites
• Undesignated Buildings/Sites
• Conservation Areas with a low proportion of Listed Buildings
• Vessels which are not designated by the National Register of Historic Vessels
• Museums/Libraries/Archives of local importance
• Contemporary Art
• Locally designated nature conservation sites
For example, greatly improved access for the public to a Grade 1 listed building would have a higher heritage merit than to a museum of local importance.

Economic impact is determined by an assessment of the potential impact associated with the intended outputs from the projects: e.g.

• Jobs created
• Jobs safeguarded
• Qualifications gained
• Increased visitor numbers
• Increased visitor spend (direct and indirect)
• Floorspace brought back into use
• Buildings restored

The initial assessment of the projects has to be based on the available information. This will often be limited in scope, and may have to rely on evidence from similar projects for comparison. It represents an assessment of the prima facie case for heritage and economic impact.
Economic impact must be determined by an assessment of the potential impact associated with the intended outputs from the projects.

For example, a new build Museum of Liverpool would create a high level of economic impact as the output would be a nationally important visitor attraction with the potential to attract thousands of visitors, not only to the museum but to Liverpool in general.
At the other end of the scale repairs and restoration works to a cemetery is unlikely to produce any significant economic impact on the surrounding area.
The following diagram shows how this quadrant analysis can be linked to funding agendas:


High Heritage Benefit/Merit
1
Heritage funders
Heritage and NWDA funders
Low Economic Benefit
High Economic Benefit
Local significance only
NWDA
4
Low Heritage Benefit/Merit
2
Obviously, the Framework would like to encourage more projects to develop so that they increase both their heritage and economic benefit.
© Culture Northwest 2007. All Rights Reserved 12
Ranking Projects - Stage 2
The second stage is to rank the projects to identify those projects with the highest priority within each quadrant.

Scoring
Each project is given a score from 0 -3 for how well it ‘fits’ with each question of the criteria below. The scores equal the following:
0: No fit
1: Poor fit
2: Fair fit
3: Excellent fit

1. How well does your project link to other existing strategies in the area?
Amongst others you may need to refer to the following documents:

  • • The NWDA’s Regional Economic Strategy NWDA RES.
  • • The New Vision for North West Coastal Resorts NWDA coast resorts
  • • Historic Towns and Cities in England’s Northwest Historic towns
  • • Heritage Counts Heritage counts
  • • English Heritage’s Regional Strategy EH strategy
  • • HLF’s objectives and priorities HLF Strategy
  • • Tourism Destination Management Plan DMP
  • • Vision 2015 Tourism Strategy Vision 2015
  • • MLA NW Strategy MLA NW
  • • A Heritage Investment Framework for the City of Liverpool
  • • St Helens Heritage Strategy St Helens
  • Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project
  • • Helps to deliver greater inclusiveness for the Merseyside community
  • • Provides benefit for people within the area
  • • Provides a better range of employment opportunities where strategies have identified the need.
  • • Helps reduce problems of transport and communication
  • • Contributes to growth of local businesses
  • • Contributes to the competitiveness of Merseyside
  • • Develops and exploits the region's knowledge base
  • • Contributes to the health of Merseyside people
  • • Contributes to the positive image of the area or region through the unique nature of the building, site or collection
  • • Contributes to a branding or marketing tool for the region
  • • Contributes to the growth of tourism in the region
  • • Meets defined social and educational needs
7 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 4, 5 or 6 ticks would give a score of 2; and 2 or 3 ticks would give a score of 1

2. How important are the heritage outcomes?
Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project
  • • Encourages more people to be involved in making decisions about their heritage
  • • Encourages more people to be involved in volunteering
  • • Ensures that everyone can learn about and have access (physical/intellectual) to, and enjoy their heritage
  • • Conserves and enhances the UK's diverse heritage
  • • Conserves, restores and repairs historic buildings and objects
  • • Secures more appropriate ownership of land, buildings and objects of heritage importance (to allow greater access)
  • • Improves storage and environmental conditions at repositories of heritage material
  • • Contributes to UK bio-diversity
  • • Develops conservation or craft skills
6 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 3, 4 or 5 ticks would give a score of 2; and 1 or 2 ticks would give a score of 1

3. How much positive economic impact will the project create?

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project
  • • A net economic gain to the region
  • • Short-term employment impact: direct (employed on the project); indirect (employed by suppliers)and induced (employed as a result of the boost to local economic activity)
  • • Long-term employment impact: direct; indirect and induced
  • • Additionally – investment will create benefits that would not have happened otherwise
  • • Greater geographical and seasonal distribution of tourism activity where required by strategic plans
  • • Off-site visitor expenditure within the local and regional economies
  • • Contribute to the growth of supplier companies
  • • Skills development opportunities
6 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 4, or 5 ticks a score of 2; 2 or 3 ticks a score of 1

4. What is the experience of the lead agency in projects of this type?

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project

  • • Your lead agency has experience of delivering heritage projects
  • • Your lead agency has experience of maximising economic impact from such projects
  • • You provide sufficient evidence that the project accords with your own strategy
  • • The staff have the full range of skills and experience to complete a successful project
  • • You have given sufficient thought to the planning and managing of the project prior to work commencing, during implementation and for the longer term
  • 4 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 3 ticks a score of 2; 1 or 2 ticks a score of 1
  • 5. Is there sufficient market demand to ensure the viability of this project?
  • Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project
  • • You can show that the project is based on sufficient preliminary work and information
  • • Your project identifies a clearly defined and significant market with an identified popular demand for the asset
  • • Your project creates a critical mass of heritage/economic activity
  • • Your project considers the existing supply and competition
  • • The market demand results from a growth in the market rather than displacement
4 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 2 or 3 ticks a score of 2; 1 tick a score of 1

6. Is the project environmentally and economically sustainable?

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project
  • • The proposed project is financially viable given the market demand
  • • You identify a secure source of revenue funding
  • • You have a sound track record of financial management
  • • Your project demonstrates that it is environmentally friendly in terms of the procurement of resources/materials
  • • Your project demonstrates that it is environmentally friendly in its use of energy
  • • Your project will encourage people to use green methods of transport
5 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 3 or 4 ticks a score of 2; 1 or 2 ticks a score of 1
Total score (Maximum 18, minimum 0)

On this basis the projects with the highest scores are the most desirable projects within their quadrants. The maximum score any project can achieve is 18 as the criteria are 6 fold, and the minimum is 0.
Note: Where projects have the potential to demonstrate synergy as a result of their geographic or thematic proximity this can be demonstrated by applying the ranking criteria first to the individual projects and second, to the combined projects. This approach will confirm both if and the extent to which synergies exist.

CRITICAL QUESTIONS TO BE ADDRESSED IN PROJECT DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT: 

All heritage investment proposals should clearly identify the employment impacts associated with the investment and the assets created. The employment impact should be identified both gross and net (after allowing for displacement and cover direct, indirect and induced employment)
TOURISM: In addition to employment impacts heritage projects should identify the impact on the tourism sector in terms of the strategic impact on tourism development, geographical distribution of tourism activity and seasonal distribution of tourism activity.

LEARNING AND SKILLS: All heritage investment proposals should identify the learning and skills opportunities and the mechanism to deliver these within the scope of the project The scope for longer term or enduring learning and skills opportunities should also be identified.

IMAGE: Heritage buildings, sites and collections frequently provide iconic images with strong local identity and recognition. Where such iconic images have a national or international recognition they have the power to act as brands or tools to promote the regions. The scope for such branding or marketing tools should be considered when examining heritage investment proposals.

SOCIAL REGENERATION: Physical developments can have positive impacts on local economies and their residents. Heritage investment proposals should be assessed in relation to the impact on all of the people within Merseyside, in all sectors of society.

Summary of Possible Funding Agencies’ Priorities

The following diagram illustrates where the priorities of each of the key funding agencies lie:
The diagram maps the interests of the funding agencies against heritage merit/benefit and economic impact. This should act as a guide for potential projects that are looking to obtain funding as it shows those funders that should be targeted, dependant on the outputs of the project itself. For more details on these funders, see Appendix 1 for web links.

The transparency of the criteria and the scoring system adopted for the Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework should be promoted to all projects and each project encouraged to develop its own ranking. This will have the dual effect of encouraging projects to structure their project to maximise both the heritage benefit and economic impact as far as the specification of their project allows them to, and to encourage project promoters to bring forward projects with indicative scorings.

Conclusion
The Merseyside Heritage Investment Framework believes that heritage projects can contribute to tourism development, area based economic regeneration, learning and skills development and image enhancement.

The selection criteria for the ranking of projects have been explained in detail and the key questions that the projects must address in the next stage of development have been identified. There are incentives for heritage projects to maximise their economic impacts and for economic development projects to maximise any associated heritage merit or benefit. The opportunity to seek funding from heritage and economic development organisations for those projects that can achieve both is a significant incentive. Where projects can only deliver outputs against one of the investment criteria, either heritage benefit or heritage benefit, then those projects face considerable competition for the available funds.

The ranking of projects by division indicates that where project development resources are scarce they should be targeted at projects in Division 1 in the first instance. Projects falling into Quadrant 1 may be suitable for support from all or several agencies. Those falling into Quadrant 2 and 3 may be suitable for support from some agencies whilst those falling into Quadrant 4 may have not yet justified their eligibility for support.

Fit to the criteria shown is no guarantee of funding, but it will make any project more appealing to funders, and contribute more to the longer term prosperity and broader benefit of Merseyside’s heritage.

Appendix 1: National Heritage Funders, Policy Makers, and Key Agencies

Regional and National Agencies

Culture Northwest is a thinking, networking and advocacy organisation. It works strategically through collaboration to champion the role of culture across the region.

It is the Cultural Consortium for England’s Northwest, established in 1999 by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). Its core funding comes predominantly from DCMS and the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). The remit from DCMS is to drive the Regional Cultural Strategy and to do this it works with Tourism, Sport and Physical Activity, the Creative Industries, Arts, Heritage, Museums, Libraries and Archives.

For more information log onto www.culturenorthwest.co.uk

English Heritage

English Heritage is the Government’s statutory advisor on the historic environment. It is sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) which has the overall responsibility for heritage policy in England. English Heritage works in partnership with central government departments, local authorities, voluntary bodies and the private sector to:
  • • Conserve and enhance the historic environment
  • • Broaden public access to the heritage
  • • Increase people’s understanding of the past
  • Priorities for funding are
  • • Significant elements of the historic environment at risk
  • • Projects where there is a lack of alternative sources of funding
  • In the North West, the following priorities also apply:
  • • Buildings, monuments and designated landscapes
  • • Statutory Action
  • • Project Development Work
  • • Capacity Building
  • • Partnership working
http://www.english-heritage.org.uk

English Partnerships

English Partnerships is the Government’s national regeneration agency. Its aim is to deliver high quality, sustainable growth. Those which are directly relevant to Merseyside include:
Housing Action Trusts (HAT)

The HAT’s main aim is to achieve a sustainable and long lasting improvement in the living conditions in their areas. The objectives are to repair and improve housing, to manage housing effectively, to encourage diversity of tenure and to improve the social, environmental and living conditions of their areas.

Housing Market Renewal Pathfinders

This initiative helps turn around areas where the housing market has failed, i.e. areas of low housing demand and housing abandonment. Merseyside is one of the Pathfinder areas.
http://www.englishpartnerships.co.uk

Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF)

The HLF uses funds from the National Lottery to give grants to support a wide range of projects involving the local, regional and national heritage of the UK.

HLF is a non-departmental public body which reports to the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport who directs HLF to spend money in a fair way and in line with certain aims and priorities.
Awards For All (£300 - £10,000 in England ) Small grants for local groups.

Local Heritage Initiative (£3,000 to £25,000) The Countryside Agency runs the Local Heritage Initiative (LHI) for the Heritage Lottery Fund, supporting a wide range of local heritage projects with grants of between £3,000 and £25,000.

Your Heritage
(£5,000 to £50,000) Your Heritage provides grants of between £5,000 and £50,000 to support community-focused heritage projects.

Heritage Grants (£50,000 plus) This programme offers grants of £50,000 or more. Projects should look after and enhance the UK's heritage; to increase involvement in heritage activities; and to improve access to and enjoyment of heritage.

Repair Grants for Places of Worship
(£10,000 to £200,000 in England / £10,000 to £250,000 in Scotland / £10,000 to £100,000 in Northern Ireland and Wales) This programme is designed to help conserve and sustain heritage at risk, through urgent repairs to places of worship.

Townscape Heritage Initiative (£250,000 to £2 million) Through our Townscape Heritage Initiative, we make grants that help communities to regenerate the historic parts of their towns and cities.
Parks for People (£250,000 and £5million) This three-year joint initiative between Heritage Lottery Fund and the Big Lottery Fund (BIG) helps with the restoration and regeneration of public parks and gardens, including squares, walks and promenades in England.

Landscape Partnerships
(£250,000 to £2 million) This initiative enables partnerships representing a range of heritage and community interests to tackle the needs of landscapes, whose various elements may be in different ownership.

Young Roots (£5,000 to £25,000) Young Roots offers grants of between £5,000 and £25,000. The scheme aims to involve 13-20 year-olds (up to 25 for those with special needs) in finding out about their heritage, developing skills, building confidence and promoting community involvement

htttp:/www./hlf.org.uk
Museums, Libraries and Archives North West
http://www.mlanorthwest.org.uk

The National Trust
The National Trust is a registered charity, independent of the Government which relies on the generosity of its subscribing members (currently over 3 million) and other supporters. The Trust cares for over 248,000 acres of countryside in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, plus almost 600 miles of coastline and more than 200 buildings and gardens of outstanding interest and importance.

The National Trust currently cares for 5 properties in the Merseyside area. They are:
  • • Formby – large area of beach, sand dunes and pine woods
  • • Forthlin Road – former home of the McCartney family
  • • Mendips – Childhood home of John Lennon
  • • Rodney Street – Georgian terraced house, the studio and home of the photographer E. Chambre Hardman
  • • Speke Hall – Garden and estate, Tudor half-timbered house with rich interiors and fine gardens
http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk

Natural England – English Nature

From the beginning of October 2006 English Nature, the environment activities of the Rural Development Service and the Countryside Agency’s Landscape,

Access and Recreation division will be united in a single body called Natural England.
To achieve these outcomes, Natural England will:

  • • Support individuals, organisations, land managers and business to take action to conserve and enhance the natural environment
  • • Increase the opportunities available for people to make the natural environment and enriching part of their everyday lives
  • • Develop and promote sustainable solutions to environmental problems at a national, regional and local level and as a result increase the social and economic value provided by the natural environment
  • • Bring together organisations and individuals that influence and shape our environmental future, to achieve longer term conservation and enhancement of the natural environment
  • • Play a role in international efforts to protectand enhance the natural environment through sharing our expertise, advice and advocacy
http://www.english-nature.org.uk

National Museums Liverpool (NML)

National Museums Liverpool is the only national collection based entirely outside London. The agency is a registered charity and aims to promote the public enjoyment and understanding of art, history and science through its collections and any other appropriate means. NML has the following 8 venues:

  • 1. Liverpool Museum
  • 2. Walker Art Gallery
  • 3. Conservation Centre
  • 4. Sudley House
  • 5. Lady Lever Art Gallery
  • 6. Merseyside Maritime Museum
  • 7. HM Customs and Excise National Museum
  • 8. The Museum of Liverpool Life
http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk

North West Development Agency (NWDA)

The NWDA provides strategic leadership, programmes and funding to ensure the sustainable economic development and future of England’s North West. It covers the sub-regions of Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Merseyside. NWDA’s principal strategy is the Regional Economic Strategy 2006. The RES is the rolling 20 year strategy to shape the future economic direction of the Northwest with a particular focus on activities in the three years 2006 to 2009.

At the heart of the RES lies the concept of achieving sustainable development. The RES is of central importance to a range of other policies influencing, for example, housing, planning and transport policies via the Regional Housing, Spatial and Transport strategies.

http://www.nwda.co.uk

Local Agencies

The Merseyside area consists of 6 local authorities; Liverpool City, Sefton, St. Helens, Knowsley, Wirral and Halton each with local strategies that address heritage needs and opportunities.

Liverpool City Council
http://www.liverpool.gov.uk
Wirral Metropolitan Borough Council
http://www.wirral.gov.uk
Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
http://www.sefton.gov.uk
St. Helens Metropolitan Borough Council
http://www.sthelens.gov.uk
Knowsley Metropolitan Borough Council
http://www.knowsley.gov.uk
Halton Metropolitan Borough Council
http://www.halton.gov.uk

Liverpool Vision
Liverpool Vision is an independent company established to bring together key public and private sector agencies to produce a strategy – the Strategic Regeneration Framework – that guides the regeneration of Liverpool City Centre.

Liverpool Vision’s main partners are English Partnerships, NWDA and Liverpool City Council.
It aims to

  • • To create a high quality safe urban environment, that’s attractive to investors, employers, residents and visitors generating a sense of pride in the City
  • • To build upon the City Centre’s rich historic character through complementary and contemporary design initiatives
  • © Culture Northwest 2007. All Rights Reserved 23
  • • To establish a 21st Century economy able to compete with other European cities, creating new job prospects for the people of Liverpool
  • • To establish inclusive communities and a skilled and adaptable workforce able to contribute to and share the benefits of sustainable economic growth
  • • To create an effective and efficient way of delivering the Vision
  • • To set a benchmark for the next generation of international city centre development
  • • To identify public attractions that complement existing facilities and establish Liverpool as a world class visitor destination
  • • To reposition the City Centre as a premier regional shopping destination
  • • To create a sustainable and vibrant City Centre that supports a quality lifestyle attractive to inward investors and potential future residents
  • • To create quality strategic gateways into the City Centre, making it a welcoming experience
  • • To attract and retain young people by providing learning opportunities, and competitive career prospects
  • • To confirm the identity of Liverpool as a premier European City
http://www.liverpoolvision.co.uk

The Mersey Partnership (TMP)

The Mersey Partnership (TMP) campaigns for the region as a great place to live, work, invest and visit. TMP is committed to the creation of a dynamic regional economy that can generate greater returns for all. TMP is also committed to:

  • • Producing stronger economic development on Merseyside through co-ordinating partners’ activity in the Action Plan for the City Region 2002 – 2005
  • • Raising awareness and improving perceptions in the minds of key decision makers and potential investors to bring new business into Merseyside and encourage growth in existing businesses
  • • Promoting Merseyside’s tourism assets to increase visitor numbers and grow the economic benefit to the area
TMP represents over 400 businesses across the region and their members represent manufacturing and trading companies, six local authorities, government agencies, universities, media organisations, professional agencies, tourism and conference businesses – all working together for the future economic growth of Merseyside.

http://www.merseyside.org.uk

APPENDIX 2 – Quick Assessment Tool
To be used alongside project documents/draft application forms from funding agencies
Ranking Stage 1

To find the appropriate quadrant….
1. Does your project feature activity which adds value to any or all of the following assets?
• Grade I and II* Buildings/Sites
• Large groups of Grade II Buildings
• Grade II Buildings with high heritage contents, i.e. collections
• National Register of Historic Vessels – Core Collection and Designated Vessels
• Special Area of Conservation, including World Heritage Site
• Conservation Areas which contain a high proportion of Listed Buildings
• Special Protection Areas
• Internationally designated nature conservation sites (i.e Ramsar)
• Site of Special Scientific Interest
• Internationally and nationally important museums/libraries/archives/items
• Grade I and II* Parks and Gardens (on English Heritage’s Register
If yes it is regarded as of high heritage benefit.
If no, then it is regarded as of low heritage benefit.

2. Does your project have a significant impact (plus 10%) on any or all of the following?
• Jobs created
• Jobs safeguarded
• Qualifications gained
• Increased visitor numbers
• Increased visitor spend (direct and indirect)
• Floorspace brought back into use
• Buildings restored
If yes, it is regarded as of high economic benefit.
If no, then it is regarded as of low heritage benefit.
Having established the heritage merit/benefit and the economic benefit, it can be placed in the correct quadrant on the. separate diagram on page 27, which includes reference to possible funders.

3 High Heritage Benefit/Merit
1
Heritage funders
Heritage and NWDA funders
Low Economic Benefit
High Economic Benefit
Local significance only
NWDA
4
Low Heritage Benefit/Merit
2
Ranking Stage 2
Having completed the above, it is then necessary to establish where in the quadrant your project is likely to fall. The higher up a quadrant the more fundable a project is likely to be. You need to be able to back your answer with evidence.
Scoring
Each project is given a score from 0-3 for how well it ‘fits’ with each question of the criteria below. The scores equal the following:
0: No fit
1: Poor fit
2: Fair fit
3: Excellent fit

Question Score

1. How well does your project link to other existing strategies in the area?
Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project

  • • Helps to deliver greater inclusiveness for the Merseyside community
  • • Provides benefit for people within the area
  • • Provides a better range of employment opportunities where strategies have identified the need.
  • • Helps reduce problems of transport and communication
  • • Contributes to growth of local businesses
  • • Contributes to the competitiveness of Merseyside
  • • Develops and exploits the region's knowledge base
  • • Contributes to the health of Merseyside people
  • • Contributes to the positive image of the area or region through the unique nature of the building, site or collection
  • • Contributes to a branding or marketing tool for the region
  • • Contributes to the growth of tourism in the region
  • • Meets defined social and educational needs
7 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 4, 5 or 6 ticks would give a score of 2; and 2 or 3 ticks would give a score of 1

. How important are the heritage outcomes

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project

  • • Encourages more people to be involved in making decisions about their heritage
  • • Encourages more people to be involved in volunteering
  • • Ensures that everyone can learn about and have access (physical/intellectual) to, and enjoy their heritage
  • • Conserves and enhances the UK's diverse heritage
  • • Conserves, restores and repairs historic buildings and objects
  • • Secures more appropriate ownership of land, buildings and objects of heritage importance (to allow greater access)
  • • Improves storage and environmental conditions at repositories of heritage material
  • • Contributes to UK bio-diversity
  • • Develops conservation or craft skills
6 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 3, 4 or 5 ticks would give a score of 2; and 1 or 2 ticks would give a score of 1

3. How much positive economic impact will the project create?

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project

  • • A net economic gain to the region
  • • Short-term employment impact: direct (employed on the project); indirect (employed by suppliers)and induced (employed as a result of the boost to local economic activity)
  • • Long-term employment impact: direct; indirect and induced
  • • Additionality – investment will create benefits that would not have happened otherwise
  • • Greater geographical and seasonal distribution of tourism activity where required by strategic plans
  • • Off-site visitor expenditure within the local and regional economies
  • • Contributes to the growth of supplier companies
  • • Skills development opportunities
6 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 4, or 5 ticks a score of 2; 2 or 3 ticks a score of 1

4. What is the experience of the lead agency in projects of this type?

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project

  • • Your lead agency has experience of delivering heritage projects
  • • Your lead agency has experience of maximising economic impact from such projects
  • • You provide sufficient evidence that the project accords with your own strategy
  • • The staff have the full range of skills and experience to complete a successful project
  • • You have given sufficient thought to the planning and managing of the project prior to work commencing, during implementation and for the longer term
4 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 3 ticks a score of 2; 1 or 2 ticks a score of 1

5. Is there sufficient market demand to ensure the viability of this project?

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project

  • • You can show that the project is based on sufficient preliminary work and information
  • • Your project identifies a clearly defined and significant market with an identified popular demand for the asset
  • • Your project creates a critical mass of heritage/economic activity
  • • Your project considers the existing supply and competition
  • • The market demand results from a growth in the market rather than displacement
4 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 2 or 3 ticks a score of 2; 1 tick a score of 1

6. Is the project environmentally and economically sustainable?

Put a tick for each one of the following that you can demonstrate for your project

  • • The proposed project is financially viable given the market demand
  • • You identify a secure source of revenue funding
  • • You have a sound track record of financial management
  • • Your project demonstrates that it is environmentally friendly in terms of the procurement of resources/materials
  • • Your project demonstrates that it is environmentally friendly in its use of energy
  • • Your project will encourage people to use green methods of transport
5 or more ticks would indicate a score of 3; 3 or 4 ticks a score of 2; 1 or 2 ticks a score of 1

Total score (Maximum 18, minimum 0)

The score from the above can then be placed within the appropriate quadrant as below:


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